Help us start 2014 out with a Bang!

Happy New Year everyone!

Loomio has a chance to get our year off on an awesome footing. We are currently in the running for the MIX Prize Digital Freedom Challenge – a competition run by the Management Innovation Exchange (MIX) for organisations who are encouraging and providing for increased autonomy in the workplace.

Within organisations that use Loomio, employees are given a chance to actively engage in workplace decision-making. With this comes the freedom to innovate, experiment and bring a degree of creativity to their work that might not be possible within a bureaucratic hierarchical system. We’re also putting our money where our mouth is with Loomio’s horizontal management structure – we’ve never needed any bosses and never been happier without them!

Please help us get some great exposure and potentially some funding by Liking our entry – When Business met Occupy: Innovating for True Collaborative Decision-Making. You will need to log in to vote, but you can do it with Facebook and it only takes a minute. Click Like on our story to vote, and please spread the word!

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Event: Civic Engagement, Activism & New Media

The Loomio team are going to be taking part in an open discussion on the role of new media in civic engagement starting 6pm tonight at the Southern Cross in Wellington. If you can’t make it down to the meetup, you can at least catch some notes from the discussion in this document that we’ll all be collaboratively editing over the course of the evening: goo.gl/gYqs9

Here’s a quote from Here Comes Everybody by Clay Shirky that will give you a taste of what we’ll be talking about:

Our social tools are not an improvement to modern society; they are a challenge to it. New technology makes new things possible: put another way, when new technology appears, previously impossible things start occurring. If enough of those impossible things are important and happen in a bundle, quickly, the change becomes a revolution.

The hallmark of revolution is that the goals of revolutionaries cannot be contained by the institutional structure of the existing society. As a result, either the revolutionaries are put down, or some of those institutions are altered, replaced, or destroyed. We are plainly witnessing a restructuring of the media businesses, but their suffering isn’t unique, it’s prophetic. All businesses are media businesses, because whatever else they do, all businesses rely on the managing of information for two audiences – employees and the world. The increase in the power of both individuals and groups, outside traditional organizational structures, is unprecedented. Many institutions we rely on today will not survive this change without significant alteration, and the more an institution or industry relies on information as its core product, the greater and more complete the change will be. 

eDemocracy and civic engagement

I have been thinking in the eDemocracy and general civic engagement space for many years now, but in the light of OWS, the Arab Spring, and the increasing tensions between the haves and have-nots around the world, which are only likely to accelerate as the financial excrement seriously begins to hit the reality fan in 2012, I have more recently started putting thoughts into actions.
Seth, describing why he’s interested in helping the Loomio project